Book of Colours

A little while ago I was invited to convene a panel at Muse Bookshop with two fabulous authors, and this is the second book.

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“Book of Colours” by Robyn Cadwallader is a historical fiction novel set in London in 1321. The book follows three people linked by the creation of an illuminated book of prayers. There is Lady Mathilda, for whom the book has been commissioned. There is the talented and a little roguish limner Will, walking as far as he can from a past he wants to escape. Then there is patient yet frustrated Gemma, the limner’s wife who dreams of recognition if not for herself, for her daughter. Each character is inextricably linked by the illuminated book, and none will come away unchanged.

This is the second book I’ve read by Cadwallader, and she truly knows her subject matter. Cadwallader immerses the reader in medieval life, and invites the reader to walk with her through the muddy London streets. This book is a fantastic example of an author getting the balance of detail just perfect. Cadwallader uses enough meticulous research to breathe life into a story, but weaves it delicately into the tapestry of the novel without it overwhelming the book.

Another thing about Cadwallader’s writing that stood out to me again is her ability to create such complex characters who are relatable despite being set in a world nearly 700 years ago. Cadwallader’s characters grapple with universal themes of interpersonal conflict, guilt, love and ambition. Will is a bit of a chameleon, constantly shifting and compelling though perhaps not ever entirely likeable. Mathilda has to wear the more traditional female costume society has prepared for her, but is forced to step up when her living situation changes drastically.

I think Will and Mathilda were interesting enough, but for me it was by far Gemma who stole the show. It was her chapters I couldn’t wait for. It was her little limner’s tidbits that I scoured greedily. I loved the interplay between her warm, maternal side and her unacknowledged but fiercely capable side as a limner. Not unlike the way I felt about the suggestion of the haunting in “The Anchoress”, I wasn’t quite sure about the gargoyle in this book. However like the marginalia dancing in the borders, or perhaps even like the rose in John’s illuminations, I’m starting to think that perhaps a touch of supernatural is Cadwallader’s watermark.

A fascinating book, especially for lovers of the physical book, that conjures a long ago world and the kinds of people who lived in it.

7 Comments

Filed under Australian Books, Book Reviews, Historical Fiction

7 responses to “Book of Colours

  1. craneclaire

    I’ve been putting this off even though Theresa also said it was great, I must move it to the top of the pile.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I’m just reading this now. Probably won’t post on it until next week, but I’m enjoying getting to know the characters, including the mysterious gargoyle.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Elizabeth Crane

    This looks wonderful. I’ve been trying to purchase this book. Where can I find it? I’m in the US. Is it available in the UK? Thx.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Elizabeth, I’m based in Australia so not 100% sure about publication dates overseas but you might like to try either free shipping websites like Book Depository or Fishpond (I’m pretty sure it’s available there), check out the author’s website or maybe considering buying an eBook copy. Let me know how you go, I know the author and might be able to help if you get stuck

      Like

  4. Pingback: Robyn Cadwallader, Book of colours (#BookReview) | Whispering Gums

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