Category Archives: Book Reviews

The Water Will Come

Non-fiction book about the impact of ocean levels rising

I received a copy of this book courtesy of Harry Hartog.

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“The Water Will Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities and the Remaking of the Civilized World” by Jeff Goodell is a non-fiction book about various coastal cities and towns and the impact he predicts rising sea levels will have. Goodell has a particular interest in property, and a lot of his research, analysis and interviews centre on wealthy investors, politicians and property-owners. Goodell visits a number of places around the world to explore how rising sea levels are already impacting the enormous number of people who live on the coast.

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When I read the opening chapter of this book, I thought it was a dystopian novel about a world underwater. However, Goodell only writes the first chapter about that, and the rest of the book is a non-fiction account of high profile interviews primarily about housing. Unfortunately, as a narrative, this book was not particularly compelling. This book is very America-focused, and Goodell spent two chapters talking about Miami and another talking about Alaska. Yes, he did write a bit about Nigeria and the Marshall Islands but this is primarily a Western-centric book about an issue that will disproportionately affect non-Western countries. Island nations like Indonesia, the Maldives and the many Pacific Island countries were just throwaway lines while the reader was left instead to sympathise with the fact that the insanely lucrative practice of flipping houses in Florida may not always be so lucrative.

I didn’t particularly care for the way that Goodell wrote about people of colour either. He uses colonial and outdated terminology, and refers to the “dying languages of Australian aborigines”, “a nearly extinct Aboriginal language” and the Calusa people as being “wiped out”. Even the title of the book is divisive, indicating that Goodell is only interested in the “civilized world”.

A rather one-dimensional take on a global environmental issue, I really wish it had been a dystopian novel. Perhaps a good companion book for “The Mosquito“?

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Filed under Book Reviews, Non Fiction

Body Music

Collection of short graphic stories about love and intimacy

Content warning: sexual themes

I picked this book up from Canty’s Bookshop recently. They have been getting in some great graphic novel stock, and this one caught my eye because the author is the same author behind “Blue is the Warmest Colour” that famously was made into an incredible film.

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“Body Music” by Julie Maroh is a collection of short graphic stories set in the city of Montreal, Canada. Each story explores issues around love between two (or more) people, transcending gender, race and age. Some of the characters feature in more than one vignette, but each story is, for the most part, a standalone story.

Maroh is an exceptional artist with an honest illustrative style that highlights the beauty, the grotesque and the humanity that can be found in everyday life. Maroh has a natural flair for storytelling with each panel a quiet revelation of hope, pain, loneliness, and love. I really loved chapter 14, The Ghost of Illness, chapter 16, In the Heat of the Club. Sait Catherine Street East, and Charlene’s perspective in chapter 6, Fantasies of the Hypothetical. Maroh did an exceptional job depicting her characters with disabilities (which included a wheelchair user, a person who develops blindness and two men who use sign language), and presents sex as something awkward, humorous and tender. I also really enjoyed the diversity of bodies: slim, curvy, freckled, hairy.

While I felt that this was a beautiful book, I felt that there was something missing to tie all the stories together. Maroh is very committed to diversity, in theme as well as in her characters, but I think a side effect of this was that there wasn’t really a strong common thread to unite each vignette. Perhaps if she had intertwined the stories even more, and had more overlap between the characters and their experiences of living and loving Montreal, I may have gotten a stronger sense of the city itself.

A poignant and thought-provoking book full of excellent examples of the storytelling strength of the graphic novel genre.

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Filed under Book Reviews, Graphic Novels

The Mosquito

History of the impact of mosquito-borne disease on war

I received a copy of this book courtesy of the publisher.

“The Mosquito: A human history of our deadliest predator” by Timothy C. Winegard is a non-fiction history of the influence mosquitoes and the diseases that they carry have had on humanity. The book encompasses ancient and modern history, and explores the devastating impact of diseases such as malaria on pivotal historical moments. To make sure you don’t think it’s a book about something else (like I did), this is at heart a military history.

I was really excited to read this book, and I loved the opening. Winegard connects with the reader through the universal experience of being annoyed with a mosquito, and provides a play by play of just exactly how the mosquito’s bite is so irritating. Winegard is certainly very knowledgeable about history, especially military history, and provides a thorough overview of some of the most well-discussed parts of Western history.

Although Winegard’s enthusiasm doesn’t wane as the book progresses, mine certainly did. I was expecting a lot more social and scientific history, and was hoping to read how mosquitoes had shaped our culture and progress. Every time Winegard touched on an area of scientific significance like the decision not to drain the swamps outside Rome until a ridiculously late time and how the mystery of mosquito-borne disease was finally solved, he glossed over the detail. Perhaps it was a question of confidence in the subject-matter, but I really wanted to know how these brilliant scientific minds figured out mosquitoes were the vector for malaria! I reread over that part thinking I’d missed something, but no – it just wasn’t of as much significance to Winegard, who was far more interested in how casualties from disease influenced the outcome of particular wars.

There were also some questionable and likely controversial parts in the book. Probably the most striking was the suggestion that the reason (or at least part of the reason) that African people were sold into slavery was because of genetic blood disorders like sickle cell disease made them more robust against malaria and therefore better workers in the Americas. I think that this would likely not stand up to academic scrutiny, and seems to minimise the reality of racism, greed and racist greed. Margaret Kwateng puts it succinctly in her 2014 paper on race and sickle cell disease: “studies today that try and attribute disparities between the races to genetic differences may be similarly searching for a way to explain inequity in a way that does not selfimplicate”.

A well-written book with some interesting and some challenging ideas by an author whose interests are fundamentally different to mine.

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Filed under Book Reviews, Non Fiction

Impeccable Petunia

Novellas about the life and times of an artistic chicken

I received a copy of this book courtesy of the author.

Big thank you to my colleague Kez for these fantastic photos

“Impeccable Petunia Part I: Claws, Paws, Feathers and Jaws” and “Impeccable Petunia Part II: The Two Tails” by Katie Christine and illustrated by Jonathan Edward are two parts in a series about a young backyard chicken called Petunia. Low on the pecking order which is determined by breed, size and ferocity, Petunia instead spends her time tending to a little corner of the yard. When her talents for colour and arrangement are spotted by the woman who lives in the house, Petunia is privileged to be invited inside to oversee the interior decorating. However, while Petunia is busy with her new vocation, the politics of the hen house are soon overshadowed by a much more deadly threat.

These two books are quirky tales told in the style of animal stories. Christine is a descriptive writer who shines a new perspective on the everyday detail of an average backyard. I enjoyed the chicken politics the most and I very much enjoyed the enigmatic cat Macy, whose character is developed further in the second book. The second, longer, book goes off campus and Petunia experiences more adventures in a dangerous, urban setting.

One of the things I struggled with a bit about this book was the pacing. I think occasionally Christine got caught up in the detail of the physical environment at the expense of what was happening in the plot, and occasionally it was a bit hard to follow what was going on.

An original story that makes you think that those ladies in your backyard may have more complex lives than you ever imagined.

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Filed under Book Reviews, General Fiction

Children of Blood and Bone

West African-inspired young adult fantasy

Our feminist fantasy book club has been cranking through the books this year. We picked our list by nominating two books each and drawing them from a hat, and this was my first book of the year. I’m always on the lookout for diverse books to read, and fantasy is a notoriously homogeneous genre. I had come across this book in a list, and it has since caused a bit of a stir winning a Hugo and being turned into a film, so I decided to nominate it.

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“Children of Blood and Bone” by Tomi Adeyemi is a young adult fantasy novel about a land called Orïsha where people are either born as maji or kosidán. Once, all maji wielded magic, but since the kosidán king Saran took the magic away and killed all the maji, the powerless maji children, distinguishable by their white hair and known as diviners, have been subjugated by the kosidán. Zélie, a diviner who lost her mother in the raids, tries to keep her head down and help her father and brother eke out a living. However, when her path crosses with kosidán princess Amari on the run, Zélie’s humble life is lost forever.

My attempt at some West African inspired cooking for our book club

This is a spirited novel that takes the hallmarks of the young adult fantasy genre and recasts them against a backdrop of West African culture. This is a very readable book, and Adeyemi writes from the heart and her strength (and focus) is emotions and relationships. There are three point of view characters, but by far the most compelling are Zélie and Inan, Amari’s older brother and the crown prince. Without giving too much away, there was an element of magic that I really enjoyed – the ability to conjure a dreamscape and people you know inside (although there were some elements of magic that I found really disturbing). I was also really on board with everyone riding giant lions, tigers, panthers and cheetahs everywhere.

As readable as this book is, it definitely had plenty of fantasy and young adult tropes. Lost parents, hidden powers, runaways, royalty. These themes are common throughout lots of fantasy novels, and aren’t fatal to a good story. I absolutely believe that fantasy and science fiction needs more authors of colour, and I understand the statement the author was making about the subjugation of a class of people (with darker skin colour) by another. However, I think that for a novel to use tropes and still be good, it needs to have something extra and I’m just not quite sure this book has that extra factor. I’m also not quite sure that there was the correct number of point of view characters. I think that maybe it should have been two or four, because three just seems a little off-kilter.

An easy read with some ambitious world-building and some interesting magic, I’ll be curious to see how it is adapted on screen.

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Filed under Book Reviews, eBooks, Fantasy, Young Adult

Milkman

Man Booker Prize-winning novel 

Man Booker Prize winners always seem to be a bit of a mixed bag for me. Some I love, some not so much. I’ve read quite a few of them, and even tried to join in on the Man Booker 50 Challenge last year (with poor success). Of course, since last year, the prize is now known as the Booker Prize after a bit of a funding reshuffle. Anyway, this book won the 2018 Man Booker Prize and apart from being the first author from Northern Ireland to win the prestigious award, she has also been very frank about her financial situation following finishing her novel. It has a striking cover and after picking up a copy a while back from the National Library of Australia’s bookshop, I finally got around to reading it.

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“Milkman” by Anna Burns is a novel told by an unnamed narrator, in an unnamed town, in an unnamed country. The narrator, referred to variously as middle sister, daughter, sister-in-law and maybe-girlfriend, lives in a town with what is described as “political problems”. Rife with gossip, the people in the town are constantly examining each other for signs of who is a renouncer and who is an informer. The narrator tries to keep her head down, looking after her wee sisters, reading books, jogging through the park, meeting up with her maybe-boyfriend. However, when she is the one people are gossiping about and she starts to attract the attention of a man known only as Milkman, the narrator finds keeping her head down is not as easy as she thought.

This is a complex, intricate novel inspired by The Troubles in Northern Ireland, but universal to any political conflict. The book has a thoughtful, idiosyncratic style with the narrator carefully using pseudonyms and scrupulously describing concepts and events in abstract and often over-complicated ways. Burns is an intelligent writer who, through her unique storytelling, unpacks the tension of living through political instability as well issues specific to being a young woman. Although to the reader, the narrator doesn’t seem so unusual, her hobbies and behaviour are subject to intense scrutiny by her mother, her family and her community. Her seemingly innocuous hobbies of book-reading and jogging are judged by those around her, not so much because they themselves care, but because they are worried what everyone else will think. However, at the heart of the story is the way the narrator is followed by Milkman and his associates, and the way that everyone in the community assumes that it is her fault.

However, this is not an easy book to read. It took me a really long time to get through this book and the writing style, as unique as it is, it is at times very difficult to immerse yourself in. I think there was a point, maybe three quarters of the way through, where I finally clicked with the book. However, that is a long slog for a reader. As insightful and intelligent as this book is, you have to work really hard to get to the end of it, and I think that this would affect the accessibility of this book to a lot of people. 

A perceptive, original and highly intellectual book, that I think a lot of people might find a bit hard to get into.

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Filed under Book Reviews, General Fiction

Beautiful

Audiobook retelling of Nordic fairy tale 

I am a Juliet Marillier tragic, and I was so excited to hear that she had a new audiobook coming out, and was even more thrilled when I won a copy on Audible in a contest! To win, I had to share which fairy tale I would most like to see retold from a unique perspective, and I said Hans Christian Andersen’s “The Red Shoes” because (like many of his fairy tales) I always felt the punishment was disproportionate to the crime. Anyway, I had recently joined the gym and I decided to waste no time and start listening during my next workout. I had listened for about 5 minutes while I was on the stair-climber (or something equally painful), when I laughed aloud because I realised that I had just read this story very, very recently.

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“Beautiful” by Juliet Marillier and narrated by Gemma Dawson is a retelling of the Nordic fairy tale “East of the Sun, West of the Moon” about Hulde, a princess who lives in a palace at the top of a glass mountain. Her mother, the queen, rules over Hulde and the palace servants with an iron fist. Hulde is told from a young age that her destiny is to marry the most beautiful man in the world. The only friend Hulde has is a white bear called Rune who comes to visit, and who shows her kindness and takes the time to teach her about the world. However, when he leaves, Hulde is left with more questions than answers about her future. When her wedding day arrives, her life is turned upside down and she finally has the opportunity to make her own destiny.

This book was an absolute delight. I have never been so motivated to go to the gym as I was to hear the next part of this story. There are so many wonderful parts to this book that I kind of don’t want to tell you about for fear of spoiling the joy of discovering them for yourself. Hulde is a brilliant, complex protagonist whose physical, emotional and perhaps even magical strength helps her to overcome the many challenges she is faced with. Marillier does a wonderful job showing Hulde’s journey from naive, innocent girl to fully-realised woman. In this story, problems aren’t solved by violence or trickery, but rather with patience, kindness and courage. I’m still smiling about the companions Hulde meets along the way, and the thrill of finding out the romantic direction the book took. I would also like to mention that I quite enjoyed Dawson’s narration, and felt that she captured Hulde’s innocence and strength really well while also creating distinct voices for the different characters.

I think the only thing that people may find frustrating about this story is that quite a lot of the book is about her learning things that the reader likely takes for granted and making mistakes that the reader likely feels are easily avoidable. Hulde is very young in spirit, and while this means that she has a lot of character development, there is a fair amount of time taken up by people explaining things to her. However, I do think that this is a necessary part of the story as Hulde navigates issues like power, independence, kindness and love.

I simply adored this story and if anything was going to get me to the gym, it was the prospect of listening to this.

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Filed under Audiobooks, Australian Books, Book Reviews, Fantasy